Vitamin D levels determine success in cancer survival

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Sunlight News(NaturalHealth365) A paper published in Demato-Endocrinology suggests that a vitamin D deficiency may account for unexplained disparities in cancer survival rates between different ethnic groups. There is a large body of scientific literature supporting the role of Solar ultraviolet (UVB) light and vitamin D in reducing the incidence and mortality rates of many types of cancers.

Scientific research has confirmed the obvious – sunlight exposure and healthy vitamin D levels are good for us. Interestingly enough, researchers have reported that those with higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, when diagnosed with cancer, have a significantly higher rate of cancer survival.

But, the darker your skin, the more you need sunlight

Conventional science often looks at the roles of socioeconomic status, stage of cancer development and treatment protocols to explain why some ethnic groups have a better chance of surviving cancer or not.

But, up until now, science pretty much ignored the fact that anyone living in the United States, with darker skin pigmentation, has a lower ability to produce vitamin D through sunlight exposure. Why?

You see, a darker skin pigmentation acts like a filter – to the UVB sunlight – and diminishes our ability to produce vitamin D3.

It’s been proven, that dark skin pigmentation, can amount to a 95 percent reduction in vitamin D production. People with darker skin complexions (sometimes) need anywhere from five to ten times more sun exposure to synthesize sufficient levels of vitamin D.

By the way, the scientific data suggests that darker skin individuals are at greater risk for 13 types of cancer including, bladder, breast, colon, endometrial, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, rectal, testicular, vaginal and other cancers such as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and melanoma.

New evidence suggests cancer survival based on vitamin D levels

Did you know that the vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR) influences the expression of over 1,000 genes – including those associated with diseases such as, cancer and multiple sclerosis.

Findings from Germany’s ESTHER study revealed a lower risk of succumbing to disease, when the serum levels of vitamin D levels are adequate. In addition, previously published findings show that people with higher vitamin D levels have lower risks of all degenerative diseases, including cancer.

The rising rate of cancer can be tied to lifestyle choices including the avoidance of sunlight. Unfortunately, in these “modern” times, sunlight exposure goes largely underappreciated in preventing cancer or ensuring survival success – once diagnosed.

Even the American Cancer Society sees the correlation between healthy vitamin D level and better outcomes in breast cancer. They reported that women with a deficiency of vitamin D had a 73 percent decrease in survival.

Patients diagnosed with colon cancer are 50 percent more likely to survive with sufficient vitamin D levels. In addition, many studies have found that patients with high levels of vitamin D were more likely to have thinner skin cancer tumors.

When will the insanity stop! We tell people to avoid the sun – essential for life; feed them toxic food and legally sell cancer-causing (chemical laced) sun block lotions. Yet, we still wonder why cancer rates are so high?

Educate yourself about the best sources for Vitamin D

Being exposed to the sun, your skin will synthesize vitamin D3 sulfate – the best form of vitamin D.

One of the best vegetarian sources is mushrooms, with shitake having the most vitamin D. Other foods rich in vitamin D are, fish like sardines, herring, grass fed beef liver, Atlantic cod and raw dairy. Ricotta cheese has more than most other cheeses. And, yes, supplementing with high quality cod-liver oil is another good choice.

Getting to know your 25-hydroxyvitamin D level is crucial to surviving a cancer diagnosis and ensuring that any supplement you take is “vitamin D3” – not D2.

And, remember, if your primary care physician is in the dark about the value of vitamin D – then get another doctor.

About the author: Blanche Levine has been a student of natural healing modalities for the last 25 years. She has the privilege of working with some of the greatest minds in natural healing including Naturopaths, scientist and energy healers. Having seen people miraculously heal from all kinds of dis-ease through non-invasive methods, her passion now is to help people become aware of what it takes to be healthy.

Sources:
http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/beauty/sun-care/sun-affect-dark-complexions.htm
http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/beauty/sun-care/sun-affect-dark-complexions.htm
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/107788.php
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/6214958/Vitamin-D-can-boost-survival-from-cancer.html

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  • Carol Merchant

    Go to VitaminDCouncil.com —> which has global research and great information of vitamin D levels for health including cancer prevention.

  • Vincente Belenson

    This is all well and good, but in northern climes, such as where I live in northern Ontario, Canada, the time span for exposing one’s skin to the sun is very short. Supplements might be the way to go. If so, how much? How does one find out one’s vitamin D level? Blood sample taken by a physician and sent to a lab? The results would be different in January than in July. Repeated testing can be very expensive. Is there another way?

  • Miles

    The best source of vitamin D is from the sun. But if you can’t get any, then you may need supplementation to boost your levels. It is all about your plasma levels of vitamin D3, so first especially if you are ill and you are using natural methods to recover, you would need to know what your blood serum levels are by doing a 25-hydroxy D3 test and is done by using a blood sample. Request the results to be calibrated in nanograms per millilitre (ng/ml)

    These are the ranges:
    Very deficient
    20-40 ng/ml => deficient
    50-60 ng/ml => normal
    70-90 ng/ml => therapeutic range
    >100 ng/ml => toxic threshold

    Many ill people may be in the very deficient range, which is why it is important to do the test and know where you stand, as you may need a lot of D3 to get you into the playing field to boost your serum levels.

    There is standard dosages to take, however to really know how much you need to maintain a normal range of D3 the test should be done first.