Artificially sweetened products threaten heart health, study reveals

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artificial-sweeteners

(NaturalHealth365) Just about everyone knows that sugary beverages not only destroy weight loss plans, but also trigger negative health effects.  Unfortunately, as a replacement for sugar-laced beverages, too many people still turn to soda with artificial sweeteners – with the hope of cutting out “empty calories.”

However, there’s a growing body of scientific evidence that suggests it’s a really bad move.

Excessive sugar consumption continues to be a problem in the Western diet, contributing to health conditions like diabetes, obesity plus much more.  However, while diet soda and other diet drinks are popular, one new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that artificially sweetened beverages have the potential to increase the risk of heart disease and other serious health conditions.

Discover what artificial sweeteners can do to your cardiovascular system

The study looked at regular consumption of soda and found that individuals who consume soft drinks regularly have a higher risk of mortality over 16 years compared to those who drink them infrequently.  Data from more than 450,000 men and women who were a part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was considered, with initial dietary assessments done on the type and number of soft drinks consumed daily, weekly and monthly when individuals enrolled.

Individuals who consumed two or more glasses of soda a day had a 17% higher risk of dying from any cause during the 16.4-year follow-up period.  For those who drank beverages with artificial sweeteners, their mortality risk was 26% greater.

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Among those who had a high intake of sweetened sodas, the risk of dying of heart disease was 27%.  Shockingly, people that drank sodas with artificial sweeteners had a 59% greater risk, far higher than in those who consumed the sugary sodas.

Beyond heart disease, drinking a glass a day of sugary beverages was also linked to a 59% higher risk of digestive diseases.

Don’t be fooled: Fruits juices can be just as bad as soda

While some people turn to fruit juices thinking they’re a healthier beverage choice, they can be just as bad as sodas. Regular consumption of commercially-produced fruit juices has also been linked to premature death.

Consuming 10% of more of your daily calories from sugary drinks increases the risk of dying from heart disease by 44%, and that includes drinking store-bought fruit juice.

Both sugary beverages and soda with artificial sweeteners come with serious health risks, and this recent study showed that drinking artificially sweetened beverages was even more dangerous than consuming the sugary ones.

And remember, artificial sweeteners don’t just show up in sodas, they’re often found in juices, coffee drinks and “diet” sweets like cupcakes and donuts.  Even some ‘healthy-sounding’ beverages contain them.

Bottom line: Instead of drinking sugary sodas, artificially sweetened beverages or fruit juices, try staying well hydrated with plenty of clean (purified) water – every day.  If you want something sweet, go for an organic apple or a bunch of blueberries.

And, if you’re having trouble with your blood sugar levels – you might want to look at the value of alpha lipoic acid.

To learn more about the dangers of artificial sweeteners, listen to this mind-blowing NaturalHealth365 Podcast with Jonathan Landsman.  You’ll never look at artificial sweeteners the same again.

Sources for this article include:

JAMANetwork.com
LifeExtension.com
NaturalHealth365.com
ConsumerReports.com