Merck downplayed risk of suicide and depression caused by its popular asthma drug, lawsuit alleges

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asthma-drug-linked-to-depression(NaturalHealth365)  Depression is indeed a significant and widespread mental health issue, affecting millions of people around the world.  It can be challenging for individuals to openly discuss their struggles with depression due to various reasons, including societal stigma and fear of judgment.  While some individuals may attempt to mask their pain using substances like alcohol or marijuana, these are not effective or healthy long-term solutions for managing depression.

To make matters worse, not enough people understand that many medications actually contribute to the growing depression problem.  As an example, a lawsuit alleges an asthma drug made by Merck has the potential to cause depression or even suicide, yet the pharmaceutical company allegedly downplayed those risks.

Details of the lawsuit filed against Merck

The lawsuit alleges that Merck’s executives knew that its asthma drug, Singulair, might cause youngsters to become depressed and commit suicide yet concealed those risks for corporate financial gain.

Though Merck’s corporate attorneys sheepishly hid behind the legal liability cover of the doctrine of federal preemption that states federal regulations and federal law supersede the laws of the states, the parents of the affected children are relentless in their quest for justice.  Those parents have patiently waited decades for the lawsuit to reach its current stage.

Merck allegedly failed to provide asthma patients and their parents with due care

Merck executives are alleged to be negligent, meaning they did not uphold their duty of care to patients using Singulair.  The lawsuit alleges several dozen individuals, including some kids, were diagnosed with severe brain problems or committed suicide after using Singulair to treat asthma and/or allergies.

If the plaintiffs’ attorneys are successful, they will overcome Merck’s corporate defense team’s delays and doctrine of federal preemption legal defense, proving the allegation that the pharmaceutical company knew the drug compromised brain health yet still brought it to market.  The text of the lawsuit alleges that the medication blocks the leukotrienes chemicals within the body that precipitate asthma and spur additional respiratory issues, including airway inflammation.

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The harmful side effects were formally submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2019.  However, those side effects might have been known by Merck’s brass years or even decades before concerned parents reported them.  If the plaintiffs win the lawsuit, they will likely be awarded damages for negligence and wrongful death.

Tips to support lung health without resorting to Big Pharma pills

You can cleanse your lungs without the assistance of a pharmaceutical corporation.  Clear out your passageways and lungs with steam therapy or a nebulizer at least once per week.  Controlled coughing, in which you intentionally cough deeply, eliminates toxins that have accumulated in mucous.

If you know or suspect your lung health is poor due to excess mucous, deep coughing might not be enough.  Consider postural drainage with the guidance of a doctor to enhance breathing and prevent infections.  Don’t forget to exercise!  Consistent exercise forces muscles to work, heightening the breathing rate and moving oxygen throughout the body.

Green tea also helps decrease lung inflammation.  Green tea’s antioxidants reduce inflammation, possibly even helping to protect lung tissue from the harm caused by smoke inhalation.  And, finally, excess mucus can be created by eating too many conventional dairy products (i.e. cheese and milk) plus processed sugars.  Try eliminating certain foods that create mucus build up and inflammation to see if that helps you to breath better.

Sources for this article include:

Childrenshealthdefense.org
Forbes.com
Reuters.com


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