New study: Chronic health problem linked with frequent nighttime bathroom trips

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New study: Chronic health problem linked with frequent nighttime bathroom trips

(NaturalHealth365) Have you ever heard of nocturia?  It’s a medical term that applies to people who have to frequently urinate at night.  Many risk factors for this condition are relatively obvious and preventable – such as consuming too many fluids and food before bedtime or taking certain medications like beta-blockers.  But, there’s much more to be concerned about – when it comes to nighttime bathroom trips.

New research out of Japan points to another more serious reason behind many people’s frequent urination frustration.  The culprit?  High blood pressure, better known as hypertension.

This chronic illness is problematic in its own right and is also a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, glaucoma, and several other health conditions.

Research confirms that nighttime bathroom trips are telling us something important about our health

The study in question – which was presented at the 83rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society March 29-31st, 2019 – involved over 3,749 Japanese adult residents of Watari, Japan. After combing through check-up data and questionnaires filled out by nearly half the participants, the researchers discovered a surprising trend:

People who got up frequently in the night to use the bathroom were 40% more likely to have hypertension.

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Hypertension is clinically defined as having a blood pressure reading of at least 140/90 mmHg.  In the study, the researchers also defined participants as having hypertension if they had been prescribed a blood pressure lowering drug from their physician.

While the researchers rightly pointed out that the results of their study were not enough to prove causation, the correlation make sense, since many people with hypertension have excess fluid in their bodies. And its an important relationship to know – because both hypertension and insufficient sleep are definitively linked with poorer health.

Your takeaway? If you find yourself waking up a lot at night to relieve yourself, check in with your integrative physician.  Early detection of hypertension can improve outcomes – especially if you take personal responsibility and start making heart healthy lifestyle changes.

Bothered by high blood pressure? Try these 5 drug-free ways to manage your blood pressure

How’s this for a vicious circle: high blood pressure can cause frequent nighttime urination. One of the most commonly prescribed drugs to treat high blood pressure are beta blockers. And beta blockers are a type of medication that can lead to frequent nighttime urination!

It’s possible to help yourself get out of this frustrating cycle of racing to the toilet and taking drugs.

Consider these 5 tips from the Mayo Clinic:

  1. Lose excess body weight.
  2. Maintain a healthy diet rich in quality produce, healthy fats, and ethically raised (organic) foods.
  3. Exercise regularly – around 30 minutes at a moderate intensity for most days of the week.
  4.  Reduce your stress – things like meditation, journal writing, exercise, and cognitive behavioral therapy can help.
  5. Cut back on or eliminate substances like alcohol, caffeine and nicotine.

For us, the message is clear: a healthy lifestyle can dramatically improve the quality of your life.  Don’t accept poor health as a product of ‘getting old.’  You can feel better – get started today.

Sources for this article include:

Eurekalert.org
NIH.gov
MyClevelandClinic.org
MayoClinic.org
Harvard.edu