Why take the Dry January challenge: Discover 5 surprising health effects of too much alcohol

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dry-january-challenge(NaturalHealth365) Every month, we seem to hear competing stories out there about alcohol.  Is it good for you?  Is it bad for you?  And, now, what the heck is the Dry January challenge?

Now, we understand that many people enjoy alcohol so much that they’ll probably continue drinking it no matter what side of the fence the current research is sitting. But new data reveals how giving up the booze – for even just one month – can offer some impressive health results.

No alcohol for one month?  See why the Dry January challenge is gaining in popularity

Dry January was initiated by the charity organization Alcohol Change United Kingdom. The idea is simple.

Give up the booze for 1 month.  It’s a pretty good time of year to try it, although ‘Sober October’ is another popular month for abstaining from alcohol, as well (it does have a nice ring to it).

Now, research from the University of Sussex reveals just how helpful this one month challenge really is.

After looking at survey results of over 800 people who took part in Dry January in 2018, the team of English researchers discovered some impressive findings: 93% of those surveyed reported a sense of achievement, 88% saved money, 82% had a greater sense of awareness about their relationship with alcohol, and 71% slept better.

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The benefits didn’t stop there: 58% reported weight loss, 54% reported better skin, and 57% had better concentration – all from the simple act of passing on the booze!

But, wait!  There’s one MORE really great result

Perhaps just as impressive, the researchers found that a majority of the Dry January participants were still drinking less once August came around.

The researchers are hopeful about this news: indicating that it may be just enough to inspire more people to, if not give up alcohol completely, then at least be more conscious about their drinking habits and (hopefully) cut back.

After all, just look at how much you’d have to gain.

It’s not just about your liver or body weight: Discover these 5 surprising ways alcohol negatively affects your health

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), excessive alcohol consumption caused 88,000 annual deaths and 2.5 million years of “potential life lost” in the United States between 2006 and 2010.

And while most people joke that a ‘rough night’ out really hurts their waistline and their liver (and their wallet, for that matter), the negative impact of excessive alcohol consumption affects far more than just these aspects of your health.

Consider the following:

  1. Too much alcohol can alter the healthy bacteria in your gut, impairing your digestion and immune system. This may also contribute to nutritional deficiencies, as well.
  2. Alcohol is well known as a major risk factor for chronic health conditions including heart disease, dementia, and cancer – not to mention injury and death due to car crashes and other types of accidents.
  3. Excessive alcohol consumption can inflame your pancreas, leading to an acute and painful case of pancreatitis.
  4. Too much booze can also make your heart weak and beat irregularly.
  5. Too much alcohol is bad for the brain – both in the short term (e.g., blackouts and memory loss) and long term (e.g., disruption in the growth of new brain cells).

So, remember: If you’re going to drink – drink responsibly.  Although, in all honesty, for many people under the influence of alcohol, it is difficult to think (and act) ‘responsibly.’

Conventionally speaking, most doctors seem to agree that up to 2 drinks per day for men and 1 drink per day for women is a ‘safe’ level to aim for.  But if you can do less, why not try it?

You may just be amazed by how good you truly feel.

And, in reality – if you drink every day right now, you might not even realize just how much it’s affecting you.  So, why not experiment with the Dry January challenge and see the results for yourself.

Sources for this article include:

MedicalNewsToday.com
ClevelandClinic.org
CDC.gov
NIH.gov
Sussex.ac.uk
News-Medical.net
MedicalNewsToday.com